electronics

First-ever visualizations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure could lead to longer-lasting devices in the future!

First-ever visualizations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure could lead to longer-lasting devices in the future!

Electronic structure of a semiconductor device – how it behaves when voltage is applied – visualized for the first time. Insights from the technique will help development of high performance electronics with low power consumption. This will help to to pave the way for two dimensional semiconductors in future electronics

We accidentally created a new wonder material that could revolutionise batteries and electronics

We accidentally created a new wonder material that could revolutionise batteries and electronics

Some of the most famous scientific discoveries happened by accident. From Teflon and the microwave oven to penicillin, scientists trying to solve a problem sometimes find unexpected things. This is exactly how we created phosphorene nanoribbons – a material made from one of the universe’s basic building blocks, but that has the potential to revolutionise a wide range of technologies.

Space weather threatens high-tech life

 Space weather threatens high-tech life

Shortly after 4 a.m. on a crisp, cloudless September morning in 1859, the sky above what is currently Colorado erupted in bright red and green colors. Fooled by the brightness into thinking it was an early dawn, gold-rush miners in the mountainous region of what was then called the Kansas Territory woke up and started making breakfast. What happened in more developed regions was even more disorienting, and carries a warning for the wired high-tech world of the 21st century.

Graphene isn’t the only Lego in the materials-science toy box

Graphene isn’t the only Lego in the materials-science toy box

You may have heard of graphene, a sheet of pure carbon, one atom thick, that’s all the rage in materials-science circles, and getting plenty of media hype as well. Reports have trumpeted graphene as an ultra-thin, super-strong, super-conductive, super-flexible material. You could be excused for thinking it might even save all of humanity from certain doom.

Electronics are getting small, and that is causing big problems

Electronics are getting small, and that is causing big problems

Your television, computer, smartphone or any other electronic device wouldn’t work without being able to shuttle electric charges around their circuits. Yet, as these devices gain in performance, with their individual components getting smaller and smaller – reaching the nanoscale – it becomes increasingly difficult to precisely channel these electric charges to where they’re needed.