exploring the universe

How did the odd black holes detected by LIGO form – and can we spot them in the sky?

How did the odd black holes detected by LIGO form – and can we spot them in the sky?

Great scientific discoveries often raise more questions than they answer. Just days after the announcement that gravitational waves from two merging black holes have been detected, astrophysicists are already pondering what this means for our understanding of stars. New studies are already being released and we can expect a flood of creative ideas in the near future.

See the cosmos with X-ray vision: Japan’s new Hitomi space telescope

See the cosmos with X-ray vision: Japan’s new Hitomi space telescope

In June 1962, an Aerobee 150 sounding-rocket blasted above the Earth’s atmosphere from the White Sands Missile Range in the United States of America. During its five-minute flight, the small research craft aimed to detect X-rays fluorescing from the moon. What it found instead would take a decade to explain.