gravitational waves

LIGO Just Got a Big Upgrade, Will Begin Searching for Gravitational Waves Again on April 1st

In February of 2016, scientists at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) made history by announcing the first-ever detection of gravitational waves (GWs). These ripples in the very fabric of the Universe, which are caused by black hole mergers or white dwarfs colliding, were first predicted by Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity roughly a century ago.

A brief history of black holes

A brief history of black holes

Late in 2018, the gravitational wave observatory, LIGO, announced that they had detected the most distant and massive source of ripples of spacetime ever monitored: waves triggered by pairs of black holes colliding in deep space. Only since 2015 have we been able to observe these invisible astronomical bodies, which can be detected only by their gravitational attraction. The history of our hunt for these enigmatic objects traces back to the 18th century, but the crucial phase took place in a suitably dark period of human history – World War II.

Gravitational waves were only recently observed, and now astronomers are already thinking of ways to use them: like accurately measuring the expansion rate of the Universe

Gravitational waves were only recently observed, and now astronomers are already thinking of ways to use them: like accurately measuring the expansion rate of the Universe

Neutron stars scream in waves of space time when they die, and astronomers have outlined a plan to use their gravitational  agony to trace the history of the universe. Join us as we explore how to turn their pain into our cosmological profit.

It Could be Possible to Transfer Data Through Gravitational Waves

It Could be Possible to Transfer Data Through Gravitational Waves

On February 11th, 2016, scientists at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) made history when they announced the first detection of gravitational waves. Originally predicted made by Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity a century prior, these waves are essentially ripples in space-time that are formed by major astronomical events – such as the merger of a binary black hole pair.

Dark Matter May Be a Product of Gravitational Waves with a Twist

Dark Matter May Be a Product of Gravitational Waves with a Twist

It is said that the universe is made up of over 80 percent dark matter. What dark matter exactly is, however, has continued to elude experts. Theories abound, and a recent one suggests an entirely different approach involving gravitational waves.

How crashing neutron stars killed off some of our best ideas about what ‘dark energy’ is

How crashing neutron stars killed off some of our best ideas about what ‘dark energy’ is

There was much excitement when scientists witnessed the violent collision of two ultra-dense, massive stars more than 100m light years from the Earth earlier this year. Not only did they catch the resulting gravitational waves – ripples in the fabric of spacetime – they also saw a practically instantaneous flash of light. This is exciting in itself and was the first direct evidence for a merger of neutron stars.

How we discovered gravitational waves from ‘neutron stars’ – and why it’s such a huge deal

How we discovered gravitational waves from ‘neutron stars’ – and why it’s such a huge deal

Rumours have been swirling for weeks that scientists have detected gravitational waves – tiny ripples in space and time – from a source other than colliding black holes. Now we can finally confirm that we’ve observed such waves produced by the violent collision of two massive, ultra-dense stars more than 100m light years from the Earth.

Gravitational Waves Will Bring the Extreme Universe Into View

Gravitational Waves Will Bring the Extreme Universe Into View

The first direct detection of gravitational waves on 14 September 2015 proved that massive objects can ripple the structure of space, verifying a key prediction of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity. The second detection, made on 26 December 2015 and announced this June, firmly established gravitational waves as a new window to the Universe.

Gravitational waves will let us see inside stars as supernovae happen

Gravitational waves will let us see inside stars as supernovae happen

On February 11th, 2016, scientists at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) announced the first detection of gravitational waves. This development, which confirmed a prediction made by Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity a century ago, has opened up new avenues of research for cosmologists and astrophysicists. Since that time, more detections have been made, all of which were said to be the result of black holes merging.

How giant atoms may help catch gravitational waves from the Big Bang

How giant atoms may help catch gravitational waves from the Big Bang

There was a lot of excitement last year when the LIGO collaboration detected gravitational waves, which are ripples in the fabric of space itself. And it’s no wonder – it was one of the most important discoveries of the century. By measuring gravitational waves from intense astrophysical processes like merging black holes, the experiment opens up a completely new way of observing and understanding the universe.

LIGO detects more gravitational waves, from even more ancient and distant black hole collisions

LIGO detects more gravitational waves, from even more ancient and distant black hole collisions

For the third time in a year and a half, the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory has detected gravitational waves. Hypothesized by Einstein a century ago, the identification of these ripples in space-time – for the third time, no less – is fulfilling the promise of an area of astronomy that has enticed scientists for decades, but had always seemed to lie just out of our reach.

New Explanation for Dark Energy?

New Explanation for Dark Energy?

The first direct detection of gravitational waves, a phenomenon predicted by Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity, was reported by scientists in 2016. Armed with this “discovery of the century”, physicists around the world have been planning new and better detectors of gravitational waves.

Hubble detects supermassive black hole kicked out of galactic core

Hubble detects supermassive black hole kicked out of galactic core

An international team of astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have uncovered a supermassive black hole that has been propelled out of the centre of the distant galaxy 3C186. The black hole was most likely ejected by the power of gravitational waves. This is the first time that astronomers found a supermassive black hole at such a large distance from its host galaxy centre.

Gravitational waves found again: here’s how they could whisper the universe’s secrets

Gravitational waves found again: here’s how they could whisper the universe’s secrets

The international team of physicists and astronomers responsible for the discovery of gravitational waves back in February has announced the detection of a second strong signal from the depths of space. It is further confirmation that gravitational waves both exist and tell us a whole new story about how the universe came to be the way it is.

How did the odd black holes detected by LIGO form – and can we spot them in the sky?

How did the odd black holes detected by LIGO form – and can we spot them in the sky?

Great scientific discoveries often raise more questions than they answer. Just days after the announcement that gravitational waves from two merging black holes have been detected, astrophysicists are already pondering what this means for our understanding of stars. New studies are already being released and we can expect a flood of creative ideas in the near future.

Pulsar Web Could Detect Low-Frequency Gravitational Waves

Pulsar Web Could Detect Low-Frequency Gravitational Waves

The recent detection of gravitational waves by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) came from two black holes, each about 30 times the mass of our sun, merging into one. Gravitational waves span a wide range of frequencies that require different technologies to detect. A new study from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) has shown that low-frequency gravitational waves could soon be detectable by existing radio telescopes.