north pole

The Earth’s magnetic north pole is shifting rapidly – so what will happen to the northern lights?

The Earth’s magnetic north pole is shifting rapidly – so what will happen to the northern lights?

Like most planets in our solar system, the Earth has its own magnetic field. Thanks to its largely molten iron core, our planet is in fact a bit like a bar magnet. It has a north and south magnetic pole, separate from the geographic poles, with a field connecting the two. This field protects our planet from radiation and is responsible for creating the northern and southern lights – spectacular events that are only visible near the magnetic poles.

Don’t panic: the northern lights won’t be turning off anytime soon

Don’t panic: the northern lights won’t be turning off anytime soon

The northern lights are nature’s very own magnificent light show. They are the mesmerising end result of electrically charged particles from the sun colliding with the Earth’s upper atmosphere. Though more frequently witnessed from the polar regions, the UK and other places on similar latitudes are lucky enough for the aurora borealis to occasionally grace their night sky.