nuclear fusion

Chinese Fusion Experiment Reaches 100 Million Degrees

Chinese Fusion Experiment Reaches 100 Million Degrees

Fusion power has been the fevered dream of scientists, environmentalists and futurists for almost a century. For the past few decades, scientists have been attempting to find a way to create sustainable fusion reactions that would provide human beings with clean, abundant energy, which would finally break our dependence on fossil fuels and other unclean methods.

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However, here’s a large selection of featured articles that might interest you:

Fusion energy: A time of transition and potential

Fusion energy: A time of transition and potential

For centuries, humans have dreamed of harnessing the power of the sun to energize our lives here on Earth. But we want to go beyond collecting solar energy, and one day generate our own from a mini-sun. If we’re able to solve an extremely complex set of scientific and engineering problems, fusion energy promises a green, safe, unlimited source of energy. From just one kilogram of deuterium extracted from water per day could come enough electricity to power hundreds of thousands of homes.

Why lightsabers would be far more lethal than George Lucas envisioned

Why lightsabers would be far more lethal than George Lucas envisioned

Research is an unpredictable process. Sometimes you end up making a really cool discovery that you didn’t see coming. I recently uncovered a fundamental property of lightsabers (that’s right – the awesome weapons from Star Wars) while doing my regular plasma physics research. I found that, while it is in theory possible to build a lightsaber, it’s likely it would be the most dangerous weapon ever created – both for the perpetrator and the victim.

Explainer: what is a hydrogen bomb? (And why it may not be what North Korea exploded)

Explainer: what is a hydrogen bomb? (And why it may not be what North Korea exploded)

Reports that North Korea has launched a fourth nuclear weapons test – backed by convincing seismic data – have caused widespread alarm. North Korean officials announced in advance that the test would involve “a totally different type of nuclear bomb” from those trialled in previous years. Following the test, North Korean state television lauded the first detonation of a “hydrogen bomb" as a “national epoch-making event”.