obesity

People with ‘obesity gene’ can still lose weight

People with ‘obesity gene’ can still lose weight

It’s been one of the most astonishing changes in human anatomy. In just one generation, people all over the world have got a lot bigger. Although we’re also gradually getting a bit taller, the really big change has been in body fat. And while much of this is put down to lifestyle, some suggest that “obesity genes” mean it is easy for some people to gain weight and more difficult for them to lose weight

Want to lose weight? Train the brain, not the body

Want to lose weight? Train the brain, not the body

Despite massive government, medical and individual efforts to win the war on obesity, 71 percent of Americans are overweight. The average adult is 24 pounds heavier today than in 1960. Our growing girth adds some US$200 billion per year to our health care expenditure, amounting to a severe health crisis.

A metabolic master switch underlying human obesity

A metabolic master switch underlying human obesity

Obesity is one of the biggest public health challenges of the 21st century. Affecting more than 500 million people worldwide, obesity costs at least $200 billion each year in the United States alone, and contributes to potentially fatal disorders such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer.

One Night of Poor Sleep Could Equal Six Months on a High-Fat Diet, Study Shows

One Night of Poor Sleep Could Equal Six Months on a High-Fat Diet, Study Shows

New research finds that one night of sleep deprivation and six months on a high-fat diet could both impair insulin sensitivity to a similar degree, demonstrating the importance of a good night’s sleep on health. This study, conducted by Josiane Broussard, PhD, and colleagues from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, CA, used a canine model to examine whether sleep deprivation and a high-fat diet affect insulin sensitivity in similar ways.