Physics

Experiments with optical tweezers race to test the laws of quantum mechanics

 Experiments with optical tweezers race to test the laws of quantum mechanics

One might think that the optical tweezer – a focused laser beam that can trap small particles – is old hat by now. After all, the tweezer was invented by Arthur Ashkin in 1970. And he received the Nobel Prize for it this year - presumably after its main implications had been realized during the last half-century.

Mystery particle spotted? Discovery would require physics so weird that nobody has even thought of it

Mystery particle spotted? Discovery would require physics so weird that nobody has even thought of it

There was a huge amount of excitement when the Higgs boson was first spotted back in 2012 – a discovery that bagged the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2013. The particle completed the so-called standard model, our current best theory of understanding nature at the level of particles.

This Super Powerful Magnetic Field Puts Us One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion

This Super Powerful Magnetic Field Puts Us One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion

Inexpensive clean energy sounds like a pipe dream. Scientists have long thought that nuclear fusion, the type of reaction that powers stars like the Sun, could be one way to make it happen, but the reaction has been too difficult to maintain. Now, we’re closer than ever before to making it happen — physicists from the University of Tokyo (UTokyo) say they’ve produced the strongest-ever controllable magnetic field.

Celebrating the 150th anniversary of helium’s discovery – why we need it more than ever

Celebrating the 150th anniversary of helium’s discovery – why we need it more than ever

Watching helium gas lift balloons into the air is a lot of fun – or perhaps a tragedy if that balloon belonged to a small child who let it go. And, who hasn’t sipped the helium gas from a balloon and then quacked like Donald Duck? Although, that’s not the smartest thing to do since helium can displace the air in our lungs, or cause other problems with respiration.

The coldest place in space has been created. Next challenge, coldest place in the universe

The coldest place in space has been created. Next challenge, coldest place in the universe

Despite decades of ongoing research, scientists are trying to understand how the four fundamental forces of the Universe fit together. Whereas quantum mechanics can explain how three of these forces things work together on the smallest of scales (electromagnetism, weak and strong nuclear forces), General Relativity explains how things behaves on the largest of scales (i.e. gravity). In this respect, gravity remains the holdout.

Plasma, the mysterious (and powerful) fourth phase of matter

Plasma, the mysterious (and powerful) fourth phase of matter

When I was at elementary school, my teacher told me that matter exists in three possible states: solid, liquid and gas. She neglected to mention plasma, a special kind of electrified gas that’s a state unto itself. We rarely encounter natural plasma, unless we’re lucky enough to see the Northern lights, or if we look at the Sun through a special filter, or if we poke our head out the window during a lightning storm, as I liked to do when I was a kid. Yet plasma, for all its scarcity in our daily lives, makes up more than 99 per cent of the observable matter in the Universe (that is, if we discount dark matter). 

Scientists discover how to harness the power of quantum spookiness by entangling clouds of atoms

 Scientists discover how to harness the power of quantum spookiness by entangling clouds of atoms

From tunnelling through impenetrable barriers to being in two places at the same time, the quantum world of atoms and particles is famously bizarre. Yet the strange properties of quantum mechanics are not mathematical quirks – they are real effects that have been seen in laboratories over and over.

Graphene’s Properties Have Been Tested in Micro-Gravity for the First Time

Graphene’s Properties Have Been Tested in Micro-Gravity for the First Time

Everyone’s favorite wonder-material has moved beyond the boundaries of gravity in its latest round of testing. The material was brought aboard a parabolic flight, where a plane alternated climbing and diving in a regular rhythm to simulate micro-gravity for brief intervals of about 23 seconds at a time. These flights are often affectionately referred to as the “vomit comet,” as they tend to inspire some queasiness in humans. The graphene aboard, however, endured the environment and performed well.

Fungi can help concrete heal its own cracks

Fungi can help concrete heal its own cracks

Infrastructure supports and facilitates our daily lives – think of the roads we drive on, the bridges and tunnels that help transport people and freight, the office buildings where we work and the dams that provide the water we drink. But it’s no secret that American infrastructure is aging and in desperate need of rehabilitation.

For the First Time, Physicists Accelerated Light Beams in Curved Space in the Lab

For the First Time, Physicists Accelerated Light Beams in Curved Space in the Lab

Physicists have demonstrated accelerating light beams on flat surfaces, where acceleration has caused the beams to follow curved trajectories. However, a new experiment has pushed the boundaries of what’s possible to demonstrate in a lab. For the first time in an expeirment, physicists have demonstrated an accelerating light beam in curved space. Instead of traveling along a geodesic trajectory (the shortest path on a curved surface) it bends away from this trajectory due to the acceleration.

Quantum Computing Is Going to Change the World. Here’s What This Means for You.

Quantum Computing Is Going to Change the World. Here’s What This Means for You.

The science and tech world has been abuzz about quantum computers for years, but the devices are not yet affecting our daily lives. Quantum systems could seamlessly encrypt data, help us make sense of the huge amount of data we’ve already collected, and solve complex problems that even the most powerful supercomputers cannot – such as medical diagnostics and weather prediction.