Space & Exploration

Want To Snag A Job Mining Asteroids Someday? You Can Now Get Your Masters In It

Want To Snag A Job Mining Asteroids Someday? You Can Now Get Your Masters In It

Our solar system has no shortage of asteroids. At last count, NASA estimated there were 781,454 of the rocky bodies orbiting our Sun. Tens of thousands of those are floating between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter in an area appropriately named the asteroid belt.

Six Things About Opportunity's Recovery Efforts

Six Things About Opportunity's Recovery Efforts

NASA's Opportunity rover has been silent since June 10, when a planet-encircling dust storm cut off solar power for the nearly-15-year-old rover. Now that scientists think the global dust storm is "decaying" -- meaning more dust is falling out of the atmosphere than is being raised back into it -- skies might soon clear enough for the solar-powered rover to recharge and attempt to "phone home."

Hubble Paints Picture of the Evolving Universe

Hubble Paints Picture of the Evolving Universe

Astronomers using the ultraviolet vision of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have captured one of the largest panoramic views of the fire and fury of star birth in the distant universe. The field features approximately 15,000 galaxies, about 12,000 of which are forming stars. Hubble’s ultraviolet vision opens a new window on the evolving universe, tracking the birth of stars over the last 11 billion years back to the cosmos’ busiest star-forming period, which happened about 3 billion years after the big bang.

170 years ago, Eta Carinae erupted dramatically. Astronomers now think they know why

170 years ago, Eta Carinae erupted dramatically. Astronomers now think they know why

Eta Carinae, a double star system located 7,500 light years away in the constellation Carina, has a combined luminosity of more than 5 million Suns – making it one of the brightest stars in the Milky Way galaxy. But 170 years ago, between 1837 and 1858, this star erupted in what appeared to be a massive supernova, temporarily making it the second brightest star in the sky.

As the Martian dust storm subsides, there’s still no word from opportunity

As the Martian dust storm subsides, there’s still no word from opportunity

Martian dust storms are a pretty common occurrence, and generally happen whenever the southern hemisphere is experiencing summer. Though they can begin quite suddenly, these storms typically stay contained to a local area and last only about a few weeks. However, on occasion, Martian dust storms can grow to become global phenomena, covering the entire planet.

Trees are made of human breath

 Trees are made of human breath

Outside my office window, two skilled workers complete a hard and dirty job. They’re cutting the felled trunk of a tree into small enough pieces to be thrown into the back of a truck with the rest of the chipped remains. I know that this act was ultimately for my own safety. I, like tens of thousands of others over the past 50 years, regularly walked beneath the canopy of that tree.

Tess practices on a comet before starting on its science operations

Tess practices on a comet before starting on its science operations

On April 18th, 2018, NASA deployed the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), a next-generation exoplanet hunting telescope that is expected to find thousands of planets in the coming years. Alongside other next-generation telescopes like the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), TESS will effectively pick up where space telescopes like Hubbleand Kepler left off.

Water Is Destroyed, Then Reborn in Ultrahot Jupiters

Water Is Destroyed, Then Reborn in Ultrahot Jupiters

Imagine a place where the weather forecast is always the same: scorching temperatures, relentlessly sunny, and with absolutely zero chance of rain. This hellish scenario exists on the permanent daysides of a type of planet found outside our solar system dubbed an "ultrahot Jupiter." These worlds orbit extremely close to their stars, with one side of the planet permanently facing the star.

Is it a massive planet or a tiny brown dwarf. This object is right at the border between planet and star

Is it a massive planet or a tiny brown dwarf. This object is right at the border between planet and star

Rogue planets are a not-too-uncommon occurrence in our Universe. In fact, within our galaxy alone, it is estimated that there are billions of rogue planets, perhaps even more than there are stars. These objects are basically planet-mass objects that have been ejected from their respective star systems (where they formed), and now orbit the center of the Milky Way. But it is especially surprising to find one orbiting so close to our own Solar System!

How SpaceX revitalized rocket launch coverage

How SpaceX revitalized rocket launch coverage

The live streams from SpaceX have much of their roots from the final launch of the Space Shuttle. Elon Musk and company have really invested in the story telling ability of their youtube channel, and it has paid huge dividends. With the hiring of a small army of talented producers and film makers, they have set the tone for live launch storytelling. 

It looks like plate tectonics aren’t required to support life

It looks like plate tectonics aren’t required to support life

When looking for potentially-habitable extra-solar planets, scientists are somewhat restricted by the fact that we know of only one planet where life exists (i.e. Earth). For this reason, scientists look for planets that are terrestrial (i.e. rocky), orbit within their star’s habitable zones, and show signs of biosignatures such as atmospheric carbon dioxide – which is essential to life as we know it.

The universe’s rate of expansion is in dispute – and we may need new physics to solve it

The universe’s rate of expansion is in dispute – and we may need new physics to solve it

Next time you eat a blueberry (or chocolate chip) muffin consider what happened to the blueberries in the batter as it was baked. The blueberries started off all squished together, but as the muffin expanded they started to move away from each other. If you could sit on one blueberry you would see all the others moving away from you, but the same would be true for any blueberry you chose. In this sense galaxies are a lot like blueberries.

Exoplanets: how we used chemistry to identify the worlds most likely to host life

Exoplanets: how we used chemistry to identify the worlds most likely to host life

Are we alone in the universe? This question has been with us for thousands of years, but it is only now that science is on the cusp of providing a real answer. We now know of dozens of rocky planets orbiting stars other than our sun where, for all we know, life might exist. And soon, with the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, we will have the first chance to peer into the atmospheres of some of these worlds. 

With all these new planets found in the habitable zone, maybe it’s time to fine tune the habitable zone

With all these new planets found in the habitable zone, maybe it’s time to fine tune the habitable zone

In the past few decades, thousands of extra-solar planets have been discovered within our galaxy. As of July 28th, 2018, a total of 3,374 extra-solar planets have been confirmed in 2,814 planetary systems. While the majority of these planets have been gas giants, an increasing number have been terrestrial (i.e. rocky) in nature and were found to be orbiting within their stars’ respective habitable zones (HZ).

Space Station Experiment Reaches Ultracold Milestone

Space Station Experiment Reaches Ultracold Milestone

The International Space Station is officially home to the coolest experiment in space.

NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) was installed in the station's U.S. science lab in late May and is now producing clouds of ultracold atoms known as Bose-Einstein condensates. These "BECs" reach temperatures just above absolute zero, the point at which atoms should theoretically stop moving entirely. This is the first time BECs have ever been produced in orbit.