depression

Seasonal affective disorder: your eye colour might be why you have the ‘winter blues’

Seasonal affective disorder: your eye colour might be why you have the ‘winter blues’

You’re not alone if colder weather and longer nights make you feel down. This well-known phenomenon, called seasonal affective disorder (SAD), might explain why people feel low, irritable, and lethargic in the winter months. For some, the condition can be serious and debilitating.

People with depression use language differently – here’s how to spot it

People with depression use language differently – here’s how to spot it

From the way you move and sleep, to how you interact with people around you, depression changes just about everything. It is even noticeable in the way you speak and express yourself in writing. Sometimes this “language of depression” can have a powerful effect on others. Just consider the impact of the poetry and song lyrics of Sylvia Plath and Kurt Cobain, who both killed themselves after suffering from depression.

Food as medicine: your brain really does want you to eat more veggies

Food as medicine: your brain really does want you to eat more veggies

As well as our physical health, the quality of our diet matters for our mental and brain health. Observational studies across countries, cultures and age groups show that better-quality diets – those high in vegetables, fruits, other plant foods (such as nuts and legumes), as well as good-quality proteins (such as fish and lean meat) – are consistently associated with reduced depression.

We may be able to treat depression with anti-inflammatory drugs – here’s why

We may be able to treat depression with anti-inflammatory drugs – here’s why

There is growing evidence that inflammation – already known to be a cause of many whole-body diseases – is also involved in diseases of the brain, including psychiatric conditions like depression.

How the brain processes emotions - Neuroscientists identify circuits that could play a role in mental illnesses, including depression.

How the brain processes emotions - Neuroscientists identify circuits that could play a role in mental illnesses, including depression.

Some mental illnesses may stem, in part, from the brain’s inability to correctly assign emotional associations to events. For example, people who are depressed often do not feel happy even when experiencing something that they normally enjoy.

Is There An Objective Measurement to Identify Individuals at Risk of Developing Depression?

Is There An Objective Measurement to Identify Individuals at Risk of Developing Depression?

A network of interacting brain regions known as the default mode network (DMN) was found to have stronger connections in adults and children with a high risk of depression compared to those with a low risk. These findings suggest that increased DMN connectivity is a potential precursor, or biomarker, indicating a risk of developing major depressive disorder (MDD).