distant galaxies

Hubble Paints Picture of the Evolving Universe

Hubble Paints Picture of the Evolving Universe

Astronomers using the ultraviolet vision of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have captured one of the largest panoramic views of the fire and fury of star birth in the distant universe. The field features approximately 15,000 galaxies, about 12,000 of which are forming stars. Hubble’s ultraviolet vision opens a new window on the evolving universe, tracking the birth of stars over the last 11 billion years back to the cosmos’ busiest star-forming period, which happened about 3 billion years after the big bang.

Study of distant galaxies challenges our understanding of how stars form

Study of distant galaxies challenges our understanding of how stars form

The most massive galaxies in our neighbourhood formed their stars billions of years ago, early in the history of the universe. At the present day, they produce very few new stars. Astronomers have long believed that is because they contain very little gas – a key ingredient necessary to produce stars. But our new study, published in Nature Astronomy, is now challenging this long held view.

A new survey takes the Hubble deep field to the next level, analyzing distance and properties of 1,600 galaxies

A new survey takes the Hubble deep field to the next level, analyzing distance and properties of 1,600 galaxies

Since its deployment in 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope has given us some of the richest and most detailed images of our Universe. Many of these images were taken while observing a patch of sky located in the Fornax constellation between September 2003 and January 2004. This region, known as the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), contains an estimated 10,000 galaxies, all of which existed roughly 13 billion years ago.

The Turbulent Birth of a Quasar - ALMA reveals secrets of most luminous known galaxy in Universe

The Turbulent Birth of a Quasar - ALMA reveals secrets of most luminous known galaxy in Universe

The most luminous galaxy known in the Universe — the quasar W2246-0526, seen when the Universe was less than 10% of its current age — is so turbulent that it is in the process of ejecting its entire supply of star-forming gas, according to new observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).

The universe’s resolution limit: why we may never have a perfect view of distant galaxies

The universe’s resolution limit: why we may never have a perfect view of distant galaxies

Can you make out the dot at the bottom of this question mark? What if you stand a few metres away? The finest detail the average human eye can distinguish is about the size of a full stop seen at a distance of a metre. This is called “resolution”. The best resolution for an optical system – like the eye – is roughly given by the ratio of the wavelength of the light you’re viewing in and the size of the aperture that light is passing through.