exoplanets

Astronomers discovered the first exoplanet in a habitable zone with water in its atmosphere

Astronomers discovered the first exoplanet in a habitable zone with water in its atmosphere

Astronomers discovered water vapor in the atmosphere of super-earth K2-18b, an exoplanet that is orbiting its host star in the habitable zone. According to scientists, k2-18b might potentially be the most habitable out of all exoplanets that have been discovered up until this day. The researchers published their findings in the science journal Nature Astronomy

Confirmation of Toasty TESS Planet Leads to Surprising Find of Promising World

Confirmation of Toasty TESS Planet Leads to Surprising Find of Promising World

A piping hot planet discovered by NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has pointed the way to additional worlds orbiting the same star, one of which is located in the star’s habitable zone. If made of rock, this planet may be around twice Earth’s size.

Accelerating exoplanet discovery using chemical fingerprints of stars

Accelerating exoplanet discovery using chemical fingerprints of stars

Stars are born when huge clouds of dust and gas collapse in on themselves and ignite. These clouds are made up of raw elements, like oxygen and titanium, and each cloud has a unique composition that imprints on the star. And within the stellar afterbirth – from the material that didn’t find its way into the star – planets are formed.

Two Earth-Like Worlds Found Orbiting a Red Dwarf Only 12.5 Light-Years Away!

Two Earth-Like Worlds Found Orbiting a Red Dwarf Only 12.5 Light-Years Away!

In the past few decades, there has been an explosion in the number of planets discovered beyond our Solar System. With over 4,000 confirmed exoplanets to date, the process has gradually shifted from discovery towards characterization. This consists of using refined techniques to determine just how likely a planet is to be habitable.

New Instrument is Searching for Planets Around Alpha Centauri

New Instrument is Searching for Planets Around Alpha Centauri

Alpha Centauri is the closest star system to us, at 4.37 light-years (about 25 trillion miles) away. In 2016, astronomers discovered an exoplanet orbiting one of the three stars in the Alpha Centauri system. Spurred on by that discovery, the European Southern Observatory (ESO) has developed a new instrument to find any other planets that might be in the Alpha Centauri system, and it’s busy looking right now.

A ‘Forbidden’ exoplanet has been found in the ‘Neptunian Desert’

A ‘Forbidden’ exoplanet has been found in the ‘Neptunian Desert’

A Neptunian exoplanet has been found in what should be a ‘Neptunian Desert’ by telescopes run by an international collaboration of astronomers. The planet might actually be a rogue planet

Small, hardy planets are most likely to survive death of their stars

Small, hardy planets are most likely to survive death of their stars

Small, hardy planets packed with dense elements have the best chance of avoiding being crushed and swallowed up when their host star dies, new research from the University of Warwick has found. The new research is published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

The Closest Star to the Sun, Proxima Centauri, has a Planet in the Habitable Zone. Life Could be There Right Now!

The Closest Star to the Sun, Proxima Centauri, has a Planet in the Habitable Zone. Life Could be There Right Now!

In August of 2016, astronomers from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) announced the discovery of an exoplanet in the neighboring system of Proxima Centauri. The news was greeted with consider excitement, as this was the closest rocky planet to our Solar System that also orbited within its star’s habitable zone. Since then, multiple studies have been conducted to determine if this planet could actually support life.

The fate of the Earth? We discovered the remains of a planet following the violent death of its parent star

The fate of the Earth? We discovered the remains of a planet following the violent death of its parent star

If it weren’t for the sun constantly showering us with energy, there would be no life on Earth. But eventually stars like it run out of fuel, expand into red giants and finally collapse into small, faint objects called white dwarfs. So what will happen to us and the other planets in our solar system when the sun dies? It’s not been entirely clear.

Which Habitable Zones are the Best to Actually Search for Life?

Which Habitable Zones are the Best to Actually Search for Life?

Looking to the future, NASA and other space agencies have high hopes for the field of extra-solar planet research. In the past decade, the number of known exoplanets has reached just shy of 4000, and many more are expected to be found once next-generations telescopes are put into service. And with so many exoplanets to study, research goals have slowly shifted away from the process of discovery and towards characterization.