medicine

Edible QR Codes Could Deliver Exactly What Your Body Needs to Heal

Edible QR Codes Could Deliver Exactly What Your Body Needs to Heal

A team of researchers believe edible QR codes are the future of medicine. Using QR codes, the dosage can be tailored to the patient. When scanned, the code will show all information about the drug, preventing people from taking the wrong medication.

You might be in a medical experiment and not even know it

You might be in a medical experiment and not even know it

In the long view, modern history is the story of increasing rights of control over your body – for instance, in matters of reproduction, sex, where you live and whom you marry. Medical experimentation is supposed to be following the same historical trend – increasing rights of autonomy for those whose bodies are used for research.

How we can use light to fight bacteria

How we can use light to fight bacteria

During the early part of the last century, dyes were frequently used to disinfect wounds. During the first world war, thousands of lives were saved by “flavine therapy” which used dyes such as Brilliant Green and Acriflavine. The dyes were applied to bullet or shrapnel wounds to kill the bacteria at the site of the injury – for example, bacteria which causes gas gangrene. But now these dyes are being resurrected to treat bacterial infections, but with a new twist: light.

New Technique Can Provide Better Cell Transplants Against Parkinson's Disease

New Technique Can Provide Better Cell Transplants Against Parkinson's Disease

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have used a completely new preclinical technique and analysis of tissue from patients to show exactly what happens when certain patients with Parkinson's disease are restored as a result of nerve cell transplants. They have also identified what makes many of the transplant patients develop serious side effects in the form of involuntary movements.

If we want medicine to be evidence-based, what should we think when the evidence doesn’t agree?

If we want medicine to be evidence-based, what should we think when the evidence doesn’t agree?

To understand if a new treatment for an illness is really better than older treatments, doctors and researchers look to the best available evidence. Health professionals want a “last word” in evidence to settle questions about what the best modes of treatment are.