mosquitoes

Feeding mosquitoes sugar makes them less likely to bite – but don’t go leaving out sugary treats just yet

Feeding mosquitoes sugar makes them less likely to bite – but don’t go leaving out sugary treats just yet

The teasing temptation of a sugary treat can often get the better of us. But don’t worry, we’re not the only ones. The saccharine substance that our sweet tooth finds so hard to resist is also powerfully seductive to mosquitoes. And according to new research, in helping to keep the pests away from our blood-rich body parts, sugar may for once be good for our health.

How mosquitoes get away before you can slap them

How mosquitoes get away before you can slap them

Strong, rapid wing beats with hardly any push off let mosquitoes make a fast getaway. The technique is in stark contrast to other insects, like flies, that push off first and then start beating their wings frantically, often tumbling uncontrollably in the process. That strong push off also lets us know they’re there before they have a chance to escape.

Explainer: Where did Zika virus come from and why is it a problem in Brazil?

Explainer: Where did Zika virus come from and why is it a problem in Brazil?

From October 2015 to January 2016, there were almost 4,000 cases of babies born with microcephaly in Brazil. Before then, there were just 150 cases per year. The suspected culprit is a mosquito-borne virus called Zika. Officials in Colombia, Ecuador, El Salvador and Jamaica have suggested that women delay becoming pregnant. And the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has advised pregnant women to postpone travel to countries where Zika is active.