nutrition

Americans are confused about food and unsure where to turn for answers, survey shows

Americans are confused about food and unsure where to turn for answers, survey shows

More than one-third of Americans do not know that foods with no genetically modified ingredients contain genes, according to the new nationally representative Food Literacy and Engagement Poll we recently conducted at Michigan State University. For the record, all foods contain genes, and so do all people.

Health Check: which fruits are healthier, and in what form?

Health Check: which fruits are healthier, and in what form?

Most of us know eating fruit daily is a great way to try to stay healthy, with the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating encouraging us to eat two serves a day. This is because they are relatively low in energy content and rich in fibre, antioxidants and some phytochemicals that may have beneficial health effects.

GI diets don’t work – gut bacteria and dark chocolate are a better bet for losing weight

GI diets don’t work – gut bacteria and dark chocolate are a better bet for losing weight

The mainstays of most of the diet regimens of the last 30 years have been the GI (glycaemic index) rating score as well as its cousin the glycaemic load. Famous best-selling diet books such as the G-Plan Diet, the South Beach diet all used the index in some way and changed the way we thought about carbohydrates. Now a detailed new study published in Cell pays this score – and how we use it – some closer scrutiny.

Do sweetened drinks really cause heart failure?

Do sweetened drinks really cause heart failure?

Drinking two or more sweetened drinks a day increases the risk of developing heart failure by 23%, according to a recent study. This sounds very precise and very alarming. The problem with nutrition studies is that they’re usually reported with more certainty than they warrant. And the relative dangers of consuming a particular food or drink are usually not that alarming when presented as absolute figures.

Have an Apple-Shaped Body? You May Be More Susceptible to Binge Eating

Have an Apple-Shaped Body? You May Be More Susceptible to Binge Eating

Women with apple-shaped bodies – those who store more of their fat in their trunk and abdominal regions – may be at particular risk for the development of eating episodes during which they experience a sense of “loss of control,” according to a new study from Drexel University. The study also found that women with greater fat stores in their midsections reported being less satisfied with their bodies, which may contribute to loss-of-control eating.