antimatter

CERN: Study sheds light on one of physics’ biggest mysteries – why there’s more matter than antimatter

CERN: Study sheds light on one of physics’ biggest mysteries – why there’s more matter than antimatter

Why do we exist? This is arguably the most profound question there is and one that may seem completely outside the scope of particle physics. But our new experiment at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider has taken us a step closer to figuring it out.

Every time lightning strikes, matter-antimatter annihilation happens too

Lighting has always been a source of awe and mystery for us lowly mortals. In ancient times, people associated it with Gods like Zeus and Thor, the fathers of the Greek and Norse pantheons. With the birth of modern science and meteorology, lighting is no longer considered the province of the divine. However, this does not mean that the sense of mystery it carries has diminished one bit.

Forget Mars, Now You Can Kickstart An Antimatter Propulsion System To Another Star!

Forget Mars, Now You Can Kickstart An Antimatter Propulsion System To Another Star!

When it comes to the future of space exploration, one of the biggest questions is, “how and when will we travel to the nearest star?” And while space agencies have been pondering this question and coming up with proposals for decades, none of them have advanced beyond the theory stage. For the most part, their efforts has been focused on possible missions to Mars and the outer Solar System.

Explainer: what is antimatter?

Explainer: what is antimatter?

Antimatter was one of the most exciting physics discoveries of the 20th century. Picked up by fiction writers such as Dan Brown, many people think of it as an “out there” theoretical idea – unaware that it is actually being produced every day. What’s more, research on antimatter is actually helping us to understand how the universe works.

Physicists Measure Force That Makes Antimatter Stick Together

Physicists Measure Force That Makes Antimatter Stick Together

Peering at the debris from particle collisions that recreate the conditions of the very early universe, scientists have for the first time measured the force of interaction between pairs of antiprotons. Like the force that holds ordinary protons together within the nuclei of atoms, the force between antiprotons is attractive and strong.