quantum physics

Researchers reverse the flow of time on IBM’s quantum computer

Researchers reverse the flow of time on IBM’s quantum computer

Quantum simulation gives a sneak peek into the possibilities of time reversal. An international team of scientists led by Argonne explored the concept of reversing time in a first-of-its-kind experiment, managing to return a computer briefly to the past. The results present new possibilities for quantum computer program testing and error correction.

Scientists discover how to harness the power of quantum spookiness by entangling clouds of atoms

 Scientists discover how to harness the power of quantum spookiness by entangling clouds of atoms

From tunnelling through impenetrable barriers to being in two places at the same time, the quantum world of atoms and particles is famously bizarre. Yet the strange properties of quantum mechanics are not mathematical quirks – they are real effects that have been seen in laboratories over and over.

Physicists Have Discovered a Way to Track Unobserved Quantum Particles

Physicists Have Discovered a Way to Track Unobserved Quantum Particles

One of the underlying principles of quantum theory is that quantum objects can exist as waves or particles. But, they do not exist as either until they are measured, making it seemingly unachievable to identify or track quantum objects when they’re not being observed. But recently, physicists faced this issue and proved that it is not an impossibility to track unobserved quantum particles.

Physicists Quantum Entangle Silicon Devices to Send Information Over a 20-Centimeter Distance

Physicists Quantum Entangle Silicon Devices to Send Information Over a 20-Centimeter Distance

Just as today's internet requires routers, a quantum internet would also need routers that could receive, store, and transmit quantum information. The key to creating this is in entanglement, and University of Vienna researchers say they have a device that can do it.

MIT scientists find weird quantum effects, even over hundreds of miles

MIT scientists find weird quantum effects, even over hundreds of miles

In the world of quantum, infinitesimally small particles, weird and often logic-defying behaviors abound. Perhaps the strangest of these is the idea of superposition, in which objects can exist simultaneously in two or more seemingly counterintuitive states. For example, according to the laws of quantum mechanics, electrons may spin both clockwise and counter-clockwise, or be both at rest and excited, at the same time.