quasars

Quasars with a Double-Image Gravitational Lens Could Help Finally Figure out how Fast the Universe is Expanding

Quasars with a Double-Image Gravitational Lens Could Help Finally Figure out how Fast the Universe is Expanding

How fast is the Universe expanding? That’s a question that astronomers haven’t been able to answer accurately. They have a name for the expansion rate of the Universe: The Hubble Constant, or Hubble’s Law. But measurements keep coming up with different values, and astronomers have been debating back and forth on this issue for decades.

Hubble sees the brightest quasar in the early Universe

Hubble sees the brightest quasar in the early Universe

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has discovered the brightest quasar ever seen in the early Universe. After 20 years of searching, astronomers have identified the ancient quasar with the help of strong gravitational lensing. This unique object provides an insight into the birth of galaxies when the Universe was less than a billion years old.

Cosmic lenses support finding on faster than expected expansion of the Universe

Cosmic lenses support finding on faster than expected expansion of the Universe

By using galaxies as giant gravitational lenses, an international group of astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have made an independent measurement of how fast the Universe is expanding. The newly measured expansion rate for the local Universe is consistent with earlier findings. These are, however, in intriguing disagreement with measurements of the early Universe. This hints at a fundamental problem at the very heart of our understanding of the cosmos.

Quasar Light Confirms Consistency Of Electromagnetism Over 8 Billion Years

Quasar Light Confirms Consistency Of Electromagnetism Over 8 Billion Years

Back in November, a team of researchers from the Swinburne University of Technology and the University of Cambridge published some very interesting findings about a galaxy located about 8 billion light years away. Using the La Silla Observatory’s Very Large Telescope (VLT), they examined the light coming from the supermassive black hole (SMBH) at its center.

ESO’s VLT Detects Unexpected Giant Glowing Halos around Distant Quasars

ESO’s VLT Detects Unexpected Giant Glowing Halos around Distant Quasars

An international team of astronomers has discovered glowing gas clouds surrounding distant quasars. This new survey by the MUSE instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope indicates that halos around quasars are far more common than expected. The properties of the halos in this surprising find are also in striking disagreement with currently accepted theories of galaxy formation in the early Universe.

‘Category 77 Hurricane’ Winds Found Near Supermassive Black Hole

‘Category 77 Hurricane’ Winds Found Near Supermassive Black Hole

New research by astrophysicists has revealed the fastest ultraviolet winds ever detected near a supermassive black hole more than 10 billion light-years away. “We’re talking wind speeds of 20 percent the speed of light, which is more than 200 million kilometers an hour. That’s equivalent to a category 77 hurricane,” says Jesse Rogerson, a Ph.D. student at York University in Canada. “And we have reason to believe that there are quasar winds that are even faster.”

The Turbulent Birth of a Quasar - ALMA reveals secrets of most luminous known galaxy in Universe

The Turbulent Birth of a Quasar - ALMA reveals secrets of most luminous known galaxy in Universe

The most luminous galaxy known in the Universe — the quasar W2246-0526, seen when the Universe was less than 10% of its current age — is so turbulent that it is in the process of ejecting its entire supply of star-forming gas, according to new observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).